Student Profile: Savio Baptista, LLB Candidate, University of Strathclyde

savio-1-500x500

What is your name and country of origin?

My name is Savio Baptista and I am from Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Tell us briefly about your educational background

First, I graduated from York University with an Honours Bachelor of Arts in Law and Society in 2010. Later on, I graduated from Seneca College of Applied Arts and Technology with an Ontario College Diploma in Law Clerk in 2014.

What are you studying?

I am studying law in the LLB (Scots & English) (Graduate Entry) program at the University of Strathclyde.

Why did you choose to study at the University of Strathclyde?

While researching graduate-entry LLB programmes in the UK, I was captivated by the University of Strathclyde’s law school and its degree programmes. In particular, the Dual Qualifying Accelerated (Scots and English Law) programme stood out amongst other graduate-entry LLB programmes, since it allows an individual to gain an in-depth understanding of both English and Scottish legal systems.

How would you describe the University of Strathclyde?

At Strathclyde, students will greatly benefit from the quality of teaching. The manner in which lectures are delivered opens the door to deeper learning. I myself have consistently been challenged since I am required to be innovative, and think more critically as I go through my course work and assignments.

Have you been a member of any student clubs or societies within the University of Strathclyde?

During my first year as a law student, I served as an Editorial Board Member with the Strathclyde Student Law Review. In this position, I was required to read, critically analyze, and edit submitted articles and book reviews. In addition, I served as the Halls Vice Convener/President (Collegelands) for the University of Strathclyde Halls Committee. As a committee member, I took part in planning student events, and served as a liaison between the University of Strathclyde, University Of Strathclyde Students’ Association, Residence Services, and students living on residence.

Currently, I am the Editor-In-Chief of the Strathclyde Student Law Review. In this role, I am in charge of putting together the annual publication of the Strathclyde Student Law Review, and overseeing all duties and responsibilities of the Editorial Board Members.

What has been your experience living in Student Halls?

The staff members at Strathclyde were extremely helpful when I was applying for my student housing. From the beginning, my questions were always answered in a timely manner, and my interactions with staff members never left me with a feeling of uncertainty.

My advice to international students is to strongly consider living in Student Halls during the first year of study. First of all, it is a great way to meet people within your course and others who also attend the University of Strathclyde. The student accommodations also provide students with access to various facilities that they will need throughout the academic year.

What are you hoping to do post-graduation?

Following the completion of my law degree, I plan to pursue a career as a real estate lawyer. As a real estate lawyer, I would be expected to have a strong understanding of the law in areas, such as property law and contract law. Secondly, I will need to possess a range of skills in order to successfully handle the legal aspects of residential and commercial real estate transactions. Such knowledge and skills will be developed as I undertake courses in law school so that I will eventually be able to think like a lawyer.

What advice would you give to prospective students?

Applying to the UK for higher education is a lengthy process, and there are also various costs to consider. Based on my experience, I would strongly recommend getting in touch with a representative from Future Project. The Future Project team will work closely with you, and provide an in-depth understanding of the application process.

How did Future Project assist you during the application process?

The Future Project team was really helpful when I needed to apply for my student visa. I was provided with clear instructions on how to proceed with my Confirmation of Acceptance for Studies (CAS) number once I accepted my offer of admission from the University of Strathclyde.

Were you awarded any scholarships?

Yes, I was awarded Scotland’s Saltire Scholarship. This is a scholarship awarded by the Scottish Government for successfully demonstrating that Scotland is the ideal destination to pursue higher education.

How did you hear about the scholarship?

I learned about this scholarship opportunity through the University of Strathclyde and Future Project.

In what ways has this scholarship had a significant impact on your life?

As a Saltire Scholar, I received an invitation from the Minister for Learning, Science and Scotland’s Languages to attend a reception welcoming all Saltire Scholarship recipients to Scotland.

This event took place at Edinburgh Castle. It was truly a night to remember since it was the first time I had visited Edinburgh, which is the capital of Scotland. As well, I got the opportunity to go on a private tour of the castle. These experiences would not have been possible without the Saltire Scholarship Programme.

Are international students permitted to work part-time in the UK?

If you wish to work part-time during your studies, then I would recommend applying for your National Insurance Number as soon as you arrive in the UK. In my experience, the process for obtaining the National Insurance Number was relatively quick.

I currently work as a Residential Accommodation Assistant at my residence. There are also numerous part-time job opportunities available on campus and within the Glasgow City Centre. However, it is important to keep in mind that your student visa will only permit you to work up to a maximum of 20 hours per week during each school term.